BOSTON – 29 individuals have been charged with federal and state drug, firearms, and counterfeiting offenses as part of federal investigations in Brockton and Boston. The cases were brought as part of the Department of Justice’s Project Safe Neighborhood Initiative (PSN), which aims to bring together all levels of law enforcement to reduce violent crime.

As part of today’s sweep, 25 defendants were arrested on federal and state charges, two defendants remain at-large, and two others were already in custody. Today’s operation involved over 150 federal, state and local law enforcement agents from all over New England. The arrests are the culmination of two separate federal investigations dubbed Operation Landshark and Operation Nor’Easter.

According to the charging documents, Operation Landshark is an investigation that targeted impact players and repeat offenders in Brockton and Boston, each who have prior convictions for acts of violence, firearm offenses and/or drug trafficking. It is alleged that many of the Operation Landshark targets are in the top 30 criminal offenders responsible for violent acts and firearms in Brockton.

During Operation Nor’Easter, from April 2016 through January 2018, law enforcement made controlled purchases of drugs from targets in Boston.

During the investigations, law enforcement officers bought or seized 15 guns and purchased or seized fentanyl, heroin, cocaine, and cocaine base.

The following defendants were arrested today on federal charges:

  1. JC Anderson, a/k/a “Skeeter Weeter,” 46, of Taunton, for distribution of cocaine base;
  2. Chad Benjamin, a/k/a “Life,” 40, of South Boston, for distribution of 28 grams or more of cocaine base;
  3. Jarrod Benjamin, a/k/a “J-Rock,” 37, of Brockton, for distribution of cocaine base;
  4. Tequan Brown, a/k/a “Purp,” 26, of Brockton, for distribution of fentanyl;
  5. Edrick Firmin, a/k/a “Rah,” of Brockton, for distribution of fentanyl;
  6. Dylan Fontes, a/k/a “J,” 26, of Brockton, for distribution of fentanyl;
  7. Andre Gallette, 57, of Boston, for being a felon in possession of a firearm and ammunition;
  8. James Hardy, 52, of Roslindale, for distribution of cocaine base and distribution of fentanyl;
  9. Allah Mallory, a/k/a “Parod,” 31, of Brockton, for distribution of cocaine base;
  10.  Jorge Monteiro, a/k/a “Jay,” 23, of Brockton, for distribution of fentanyl;
  11.  Derek Moore, 46, of Roxbury, for being a felon in possession of a firearm;
  12.  Abdul-Karim Muwakkil, a/k/a “Tyrone Jones,” and a/k/a “Ty,” 37, of Dorchester, for conspiracy to distribute and distribution of heroin and fentanyl;
  13.  Jeffrey Oliveira, 23, of Brockton, for distribution of fentanyl;
  14.  Franklin Perry, 52, of Dorchester, for selling counterfeit notes;
  15.  Tavon Robinson, a/k/a “Smooth,” 39, of Boston, for conspiracy to distribute and distribution of heroin and fentanyl;
  16.  Tyrone Smith, a/k/a “Ty,” 31, of Brockton, for distribution of cocaine base;
  17.  Dante Starks, a/k/a “Tay,” 36, of Mattapan, for distribution of cocaine;
  18.  Orlando Waters, 30, of Boston, for distribution of cocaine base;
  19.  Gary Jamal Webster, a/k/a “Jamal,” 35, of Boston, for conspiracy to distribute and possess with intent to distribute cocaine and fentanyl; and
  20.  Rashard Wilson, 36, of Brockton, for distribution of cocaine.

One defendant was charged, but is still at-large:

  1. FUGITIVE

In addition, the following defendants, who are already in state custody, were charged federally:

  1.  Sirrocko Landrum, 29, of Boston, for being a felon in possession of a firearm and ammunition; and
  2.  Raul Robles, 29, of Brockton, for distribution and possession with intent to distribute cocaine, and for being felon in possession of a firearm and ammunition.

Six additional defendants were charged with state drug and firearms offenses:

  1.   Dana Brown, 45, of Brockton;
  2.  Jason DaCruz, 34, of Brockton;
  3.  Vito Gray, 48, of Boston;
  4.  Steven Mendes, 31, of Brockton;
  5.  Terrell Walker, 63, of East Falmouth; and
  6.  FUGITIVE

The federal charge of drug distribution provides for a sentence of no greater than 20 years in prison, at least three years of supervised release and a $1 million fine. If the defendant has a prior conviction for a drug distribution offense or crime of violence, the maximum sentence is 30 years in prison, at least six years and up to a lifetime of supervised release and a $2 million fine. The federal charge of distribution of 28 grams or more of cocaine base provides for a minimum of five years and up to 40 years in prison, at least four years and up to a lifetime of supervised release and a $5 million fine.  The maximum sentence in federal court for being a felon in possession of a firearm is 10 years in prison, three years of supervised release and a $250,000 fine. The maximum sentence for selling counterfeit notes is 20 years in prison, three years of supervised release and a $250,000 fine. Sentences are imposed by a federal district court judge based upon the U.S. Sentencing Guidelines and other statutory factors.

United States Attorney Andrew E. Lelling; Harold H. Shaw, Special Agent in Charge of the Federal Bureau of Investigation, Boston Field Division; Colonel Kerry A. Gilpin, Superintendent of the Massachusetts State Police; Plymouth County District Attorney Timothy J. Cruz; Suffolk County District Attorney Daniel F. Conley; Boston Police Commissioner William Gross; and Brockton Police Chief John Crowley made the announcement today. The investigation was conducted by the FBI’s North Shore Gang Task Force and Southeastern Massachusetts Gang Task Force.  Valuable assistance was provided by the Suffolk County Sheriff’s Office; the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives, Boston Field Division; Plymouth and Essex County Sheriff’s Offices; Massachusetts Department of Corrections; U.S. Parole Commission; U.S. Postal Inspection Services; and the U.S. Secret Service. The state cases are being prosecuted by the Plymouth County District Attorney’s Office and Suffolk County District Attorney’s Office.

The details contained in the indictments and complaints are allegations. The defendants are presumed innocent unless and until proven guilty beyond a reasonable doubt in a court of law.

This case is part of Project Safe Neighborhoods (PSN), a program bringing together all levels of law enforcement and the communities they serve to reduce violent crime and make our neighborhoods safer for everyone.   Attorney General Jeff Sessions reinvigorated PSN in 2017 as part of the Department’s renewed focus on targeting violent criminals, directing all U.S. Attorney’s Offices to work in partnership with federal, state, local, and tribal law enforcement and the local community to develop effective, locally-based strategies to reduce violent crime.